What We’re Reading: Celia’s Song by Lee Maracle

  Celia’s Song by Lee Maracle

 Wow! A very powerful read indeed!

If you are not familiar with Canada’s legacy of residential schools, the 60’s scoop, the Indian Act or policies of enfranchisement I would highly recommend you read a little on these topics first to fully appreciate this story by Lee Maracle.

 It is a fictional tale on the surface that in actuality reveals the reality of millions of Indigenous families in Canada, their experiences of intergenerational trauma and the scars of colonialism.

 Maracle incorporates traditional West Coast storytelling methods, the influence of ancestral teachings and all of our relations (e.g., the four legged, two legged, flyers, simmers, crawlers). This story also explores the concept and importance of coming back to ceremony in Indigenous communities in relation to healing from trauma. I will be adding this book to my personal collection for sure!

- – Sabrina B.

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Summer 2016 Staff Picks

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What We’re Reading: Ethel & Ernest

Ethel & Ernest by Raymond Briggs and A Street Cat Named Bob by James Bowen

I’m sooooo excited about a couple of British movies coming out later this year. So in the meantime, I’m having a look at the books that inspired them. Both are true stories and available at WPL.

 Ethel & Ernest, an adult graphic novel, is a real charmer. Children’s author/illustrator Raymond Briggs takes an affectionate look at his parents’ lives. Ethel and Ernest are two ordinary working class Londoners—he’s a milkman, she’s a maid– who meet in 1928 and stay together until their deaths in 1971. Briggs tells their story against the backdrop of history and social change. So they buy a house (with an inside bathroom!), get a telephone installed (but what to do if it rings?), and in a much more serious vein, endure the hardships and uncertainties of World War II.

Ethel & Ernest is by turns sweet, sad and funny and is just lovely. Jim Broadbent stars in the movie (I’m guessing as Ernest, not Ethel).

Now here’s the one I’m really looking forward to, A Street Cat Named Bob. It tells of James, a former heroin addict, surviving, sort of, by playing guitar on the streets of London. Then he encounters Bob, an injured stray cat. This is the story of their adventures together and of how James turns his life around. You might also want to check out the sequel to the book, The World According to Bob.

 

The movie version stars Luke Treadaway. (BTW, he also has a role in Ethel & Ernest.) As for Bob, it was originally planned that he would be played by five specially trained cats from Canada. Turns out they weren’t quite up to snuff, so Bob is mostly played by the real Bob. Here is a link to the movie trailer (just see if it doesn’t melt your heart).

– – Penny D.

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Where are the girls and boys?

   The National Post ran a story today about the use of the term “girl” in book titles. The use of “girl” in book titles has been a pet peeve of mine because  “girl” isn’t referring to a female under the age of 18 years but rather adult females. So “girl” is increasingly used in book titles to mean Adult Females.  I find this irksome as men are not typically referred to as boys.

The article is maddening. Its author claims that “girl” is a term used because it doesn’t carry the baggage of “woman” or “lady”.  Until I read those words it had never occurred to me that they carried baggage. Ridiculous. Sigh. The use of “girl” in book titles is a real thing now. I’m sure you can think of any number of book titles with “girl” in the title. This got me thinking about substituting “boy” for “man” in book titles.  It changes things. Suddenly the authority or gravitas of the book changes.

The Boy in the Iron Mask

The Bishop’s Boy

The old boy and the sea

Michael Moore is a big fat stupid white boy

Boy up!

Boy Descending

 

Can you think of any books with “boy” in the title when referring to a man?

 

Article from National Post

http://news.nationalpost.com/arts/books/girls-girls-girls-why-so-many-new-and-upcoming-book-titles-use-the-word-girl

– – Christine B.

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Summer 2016 Featured Titles

Summer 2016-2

Summer 2016 Featured Titles

Click here to view the summer 2016 Featured Titles list in a larger format (PDF).

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What We’re Reading: Dark Money by Jane Mayer

We must make our choice. We may have democracy, or we may have concentrated wealth in the hands of a few, but we can’t have both.

– –  Louis Brandeis (former U.S. Supreme Court justice)

 

The above quote serves as a preface to Dark Money. They are powerful words and carry a lot of truth, I think.

This book looks at a group of ultra rich in the U.S. who have banded together, backed by vast sums of money, to shift public opinion and the political system to the extreme right. Their ideology is a highly individualistic, anti-government, libertarian one, which, not coincidentally, just happens to benefit them (ie. the wealthy and powerful).

They favour, for example, a lowering of taxes (but with plenty of loopholes for the rich, how fair is that?), a slashing of social security and the axing of many government regulations. And, since there is plenty of oil money involved, this group denies even the existence of climate change, and is—you guessed it—vehemently opposed to doing anything about it.

The book centres on the Koch brothers, Charles and David, who are worth $41.6 billion each. The mind just boggles at that figure. How can any one individual have that kind of money? And think of the “influence” the Koch brothers can buy. Personally I believe no individual should be allowed so much money—and the power that goes along with it. It is simply contrary to society’s best interests.

 Dark Money is a meticulously researched, thoroughly documented book. It is certainly dense and heavy going, and I have to admit I only read parts of it. But it raises some tough questions about what democracy really means, something we all might want to think about.

– – Penny D.

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2016 National Aboriginal Day – June 21st

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What We’re Reading: this is not my life

this is not my life by Diane Schoemperlen

Who knows what it is about a man that intrigues you? Sometimes it can be a sense of humour, or the way his hair falls across his forehead or the quick way his mind works to come up with answers. Most likely it is a combination of traits and characteristics and features. It was that heady mix of qualities that drew Diane Schoemperlen to Shane, the Friday dishwasher at the Saint Vincent de Paul free hot meal program in Kingston in 2005. Diane, an accomplished author, began volunteering in the kitchen as a way to distract herself from both a broken heart and, more tragically, writer’s block. Shane, was a convicted murderer on an Escorted Pass.

Their relationship, spanning several years, blossomed under the stony gazes of the prison guards at Kingston Penitentiary where Diane would go to visit Shane twice weekly. Almost immediately problems arose as Shane had little experience with being part of a healthy relationship and Diane faced numerous challenges in acquainting herself with the machinations of the Canadian penal system and being the love interest of a convict.

This is a fascinating look at a relationship gone awry.

 

– – Christine B.

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What We’re Reading: 100 Nature Hot Spots in Ontario

Summer’s coming! (Or at least it’s supposed to be, but frankly I’m starting to wonder.)

So time to dream about and plan for summer vacations and outings. I’ve just checked out the book 100 Nature Hot Spots in Ontario by Chris Earley and Tracy C. Read and it’s jam packed with lots of cool places to visit.

I’m a nature fan, I think we should all be nature fans. It’s so beneficial—and healing, too — to take time out of our busy, stressful lives to immerse ourselves in nature. And we do our kids a huge favour when we introduce them to nature.

Some of the places listed in the book are favourites of mine. For instance, I love the Guelph arboretum. And there is something magical about Point Pelee, that long, long spit of land that narrows to a point. I’ve always wanted to visit Pelee Island as well, but haven’t made it yet (I’ll put in on a bucket list). Or a visit to the waterfalls in the Hamilton area (Felker’s Falls and Devil’s Punchbowl are listed in the book) makes for a great day’s outing. BTW, did you know there are about 100 waterfalls in the Hamilton area–amazing! I’ve also got a soft spot for the beaches of Prince Edward County (Sandbanks and Presqu’ile) as I grew up nearby.

But a couple of personal favourites didn’t make the cut. Like the Thousand Islands, a place that I absolutely love. And also Petroglyphs Provincial Park (near Peterborough) which has over 900 petroglyphs (First Nations rock carvings)–turtles, snakes, birds, humans and more. It is truly wondrous. (There is another Ontario site for petroglyphs that is listed in the book, though it has a much smaller number of them. That’s Bon Echo Provincial Park in eastern Ontario. I have seen those as well, they are well worth a look.)

So go ahead and have a look at this book. Then start planning some fun outings.

 

– – Penny D.

 

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BINGO!

bingo_002I can’t walk past our signs about Book Lover’s BINGO without thinking about Annette Funicello which tells you how old I am or tells you that I am thinking about the summer and going to the beach…  I’m not sure which is a better story but I am excited about our WPL BINGO.

The last time we ran Book Lover’s BINGO I had the good fortune of being at the Circulation desk when one of our customers came to pick up their prize.  It was exciting – as giving out prizes always is – and then I had a chat with the customer about the books we were reading and she gave me a great idea for filling in one of my own BINGO squares; the one about a book with a colour in the title.  I picked a wonderful junior novel which was jam-packed with pirates, time travel and suspense called The Golden Specific.

You see, I sometimes have a hot and cold feeling for Book Lover’s BINGO.  I do love to read and to talk about books with our customers but some of those categories are harder than others and working on the BINGO along with customers is not always pain free.  Last year I found it tricky to go and find a book that everyone else has read but me.  I felt a little bit ridiculous looking at the books that other people were reading around town.  In the end, I just kept a careful watch of what was coming back in the returns bin and chose something that looked wonderful and read that.  I chose Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch and it was a perfect choice as I had some time on my hands that week and didn’t mind a longer book.  It was worth every page though.

Then I moved on to the BINGO square for reading books from the year I was born.  That was a quick way to feel old fast.  Although, looking at the weekly lists from the New York Times was a nice snapshot of publishing history and an interesting exercise to see which of the books have remained popular.  I ended up re-reading one of Robertson Davies’ books from my birth year because you can never go wrong reading something written by that bearded genius.  The square that is named “book I’ve been meaning to read” just made me feel guilty because everyone has a long list of things that they’ve been meaning to do.  A book that was recommended by someone was not hard at all because WPL customers often make suggestions as they drop off their books and happily share ideas.  In fact, not too long ago a customer told me about a cheerful book based on the movie Roman Holiday with the main character remaking Audrey Hepburn’s iconic role.  So, I’m already ahead on that one for this year.  It was so much fun to read.  In fact, I gift it to you if you need a that square.  It might make you want to travel to Rome though or eat a lot of pastries.

So I guess I really am a fan of Book Lover’s BINGO.  Former OBOC winner?  Done.  Terry Fallis; the guy is always funny.  WPL Featured Title?  I can’t stop myself from reading those.  And audiobooks?  Well, they are so convenient and customers tell us all the time that they use them for long drives or listen while they walk their dogs.  You really can’t go wrong with an audiobook.  Then we have the “books are being adapted into movies” so often it’s like we are tripping over them so that is a very simple square to fill in.  Just look at the last list of Oscar contenders for a wonderful selection.  I think my cozy mystery habit definitely qualifies as a “guilty pleasure”.   Joanne Fluke has a new one out so it could be my “book published this year” or my “guilty pleasure” or, because I just told you about it, it could be your “recommended read from someone”.  You can come to the desk here at the library and ask for help with any of your BINGO squares and we can give you wonderful suggestions.  We love to talk about books and many other things, even Annette Funicello.  It’s okay if you need to go and look that up.  I don’t mind.

— Penny M.

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